Fun with Synonyms

Each word means something similar to the synonym at the top of its box, yet each word means something just a little bit different. Study one set at a time to learn what the differences are.

Study Questions:

1. Practice the pronunciation of each word in each box. In the first set, (nice), each word is stressed on the first syllable except three of them. Which three are they?

2. In the next or “good” set, there are six words that are stressed on the second syllable. Which ones are they? (dictionary.com is a good resource for meaning and pronunciation.)

3-4. In the “sad” set, is the -ed in “depressed” pronounced like a <t>, <d>, or <id>? What about the -ed in “delighted” in the “happy” set?

5. In the “laughed” set, which synonym is a silent action?

6. In the “like” set, which synonym is first in the dictionary, and which is last (alphabetically)?

7. In the “said” set, how many words end with the <t> sound, the <d> sound, or the <id> sound?

8. In the “big” set of words, which words contain a diphthong?

7. In the “little” set, which word is a derivative of another one listed there?

8-9.  In the next two sets of past tense synonyms, each contains at least one word that has another acceptable form. Which are they?

10. In the “pretty” set, which word is used most often to describe a man?

11. In the “looked” set, which synonym is used most often to mean “looked with admiration?”

12. In the last set, which word might be used to describe wood? How does that meaning relate to being afraid?

Thanks to Pinterest for Other Ways to Say (A Teacher Created Resource)

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