U.S. Civics: Democracy

These slides were developed in conjunction with the civics lesson from http://www.elcivics.com/ to help students better understand the concept of democracy and its origins prior to the United States of America adopting it as its form of government.

U.S. Civics: Native Americans

This is a  basic presentation for adult ESL students regarding the Native Americans in the New World at the time of the British colonists’ arrival on the eastern shores of what would become the United States and continuing on to what the living situation is for the American Indians now with special emphasis given to those in Wisconsin. Poll Everywhere is utilized at the end of the presentation to check for comprehension and elicit more conversation.

U.S.Civics: The United States Declaration of Independence

This is a compilation of information regarding the development of the United States Declaration of Independence and some of the immediate consequences to the signers of the Declaration. The presentation is for adult ESL students studying civics and U.S. History and can be used at any level starting with high- beginning. Questions on Poll Everywhere are included at the end of the presentation to elicit conversation and check for comprehension of the main points. My students enjoy using their cell phones to answer these questions!

A St. Patrick’s Day Brief History and Celebration Video and Quiz

St. Patrick`s Day is such an important holiday here in the greater Milwaukee area, that it is important to talk to our students about the celebration, its history, and its relevance to our culture here. To do that, I like to present The History Channel’s three-minute video, “Deconstructing History: Ireland” with its very brief history of the holiday and country of origin, Ireland.

Prior to having students watch the video, it is valuable to go over the vocabulary and geography referred to in the movie. Terms such as northern, southern, eastern, western, island, mile (compared to kilometer), square miles, width, length, rainfall, and provinces. It may also be good to explain the difference between northern Ireland and Northern Ireland. Students should know something about the Great Potato Famine and how it affected Ireland and the United States. My city, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, was long known as the Beer Capital of the World, so students here should definitely know what a brewery is. (A tour of a local brewery for adult students would be appropriate!)

After presenting the vocabulary, students will need to watch the video a minimum of twice before attempting to answer the questions in the Google Form below. How many times students may return to the video for answers would depend on how this is assigned. The “quiz” may be done together as a class to generate conversation or as a group or individual assignment. Points are assigned to each question should instructors choose to use this “quiz” for a grade.

Enjoy, and have a wonderful St. Patrick’s Day!

May the luck

Veterans Day – A Tribute to The American Soldier

I found this lovely video tribute to the American Soldier online which seemed like an appropriate way to say happy Veteran’s Day to those serving our country in the military and to their families! We remember and honor your service with respect and gratitude. Be safe wherever you are!

Labor Day in the U.S.A. and Canada

Labor Day.pngDo your students know why they don’t have classes on Labor Day? They may appreciate their day off more if they know the history of the holiday here in the United States. Unionizing has been in the news a lot in the United States in the past few years. This could be a great discussion topic in your classes. I hope this exercise will help generate that conversation whether it is managed as a classroom activity or assigned to the students individually.

Students working independently should click on this EDpuzzle link to watch the video about Labor Day with the accompanying oral questions. They will have to stop the video from time to time or the oral questions will overlap with the video’s audio. Next, have the students look at the questions and the directions for each on the Google Form below. Then, when they are ready, they should play the video again and answer the oral questions, stopping and starting the video as necessary or as assigned.

Once You Have Met a True Human Being

Once you have met a True Human Being, let him not disappear from the horizon of your Heart.

– Rumi

Ask your students to explain what this quotation means. Ask them to define what Rumi meant by a “true human being.”  Why do they think this picture was chosen to accompany this quotation? Do they agree with the choice of image? Why or why not? 

What do your students know about Rumi? Locate where he was from on the map. When did he live? What was the world like during Rumi’s lifetime?

Is there anyone your students could name as an example of a “true human being? Who and why?