U.S. Civics: Native Americans

This is a  basic presentation for adult ESL students regarding the Native Americans in the New World at the time of the British colonists’ arrival on the eastern shores of what would become the United States and continuing on to what the living situation is for the American Indians now with special emphasis given to those in Wisconsin. Poll Everywhere is utilized at the end of the presentation to check for comprehension and elicit more conversation.

U.S.Civics: The United States Declaration of Independence

This is a compilation of information regarding the development of the United States Declaration of Independence and some of the immediate consequences to the signers of the Declaration. The presentation is for adult ESL students studying civics and U.S. History and can be used at any level starting with high- beginning. Questions on Poll Everywhere are included at the end of the presentation to elicit conversation and check for comprehension of the main points. My students enjoy using their cell phones to answer these questions!

A St. Patrick’s Day Brief History and Celebration Video and Quiz

St. Patrick`s Day is such an important holiday here in the greater Milwaukee area, that it is important to talk to our students about the celebration, its history, and its relevance to our culture here. To do that, I like to present The History Channel’s three-minute video, “Deconstructing History: Ireland” with its very brief history of the holiday and country of origin, Ireland.

Prior to having students watch the video, it is valuable to go over the vocabulary and geography referred to in the movie. Terms such as northern, southern, eastern, western, island, mile (compared to kilometer), square miles, width, length, rainfall, and provinces. It may also be good to explain the difference between northern Ireland and Northern Ireland. Students should know something about the Great Potato Famine and how it affected Ireland and the United States. My city, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, was long known as the Beer Capital of the World, so students here should definitely know what a brewery is. (A tour of a local brewery for adult students would be appropriate!)

After presenting the vocabulary, students will need to watch the video a minimum of twice before attempting to answer the questions in the Google Form below. How many times students may return to the video for answers would depend on how this is assigned. The “quiz” may be done together as a class to generate conversation or as a group or individual assignment. Points are assigned to each question should instructors choose to use this “quiz” for a grade.

Enjoy, and have a wonderful St. Patrick’s Day!

May the luck

Dem Bones

Dem Bones.png

In keeping with the Halloween season and the body/health posts of recent here on Web 2.0 for ESL, the link below is to a nice little video about “Dem Bones,” which identifies and explains the purposes of the bones and joints. The English will be somewhat difficult for beginning ESL students, but see what “body” vocabulary the students do recognize. You can then sing or play the song and have the students point to the bones. Later, they can sing along with you while pointing to the appropriate bones. Enjoy, and happy Halloween!

http://www.schooltube.com/embed_force/28e699a29b2be8e4520b/

Labor Day in the U.S.A. and Canada

Labor Day.pngDo your students know why they don’t have classes on Labor Day? They may appreciate their day off more if they know the history of the holiday here in the United States. Unionizing has been in the news a lot in the United States in the past few years. This could be a great discussion topic in your classes. I hope this exercise will help generate that conversation whether it is managed as a classroom activity or assigned to the students individually.

Students working independently should click on this EDpuzzle link to watch the video about Labor Day with the accompanying oral questions. They will have to stop the video from time to time or the oral questions will overlap with the video’s audio. Next, have the students look at the questions and the directions for each on the Google Form below. Then, when they are ready, they should play the video again and answer the oral questions, stopping and starting the video as necessary or as assigned.

Segmenting YouTube Videos for Better Comprehension Opportunities

I like my students to have opportunities to view content videos delivered in English that are NOT designed for English language learners, in which the speakers sometimes speak too fast and use unfamiliar vocabulary. In other words, they speak like many college instructors or business people whom my students will need to be able to understand sometime soon. So, to break down the information and make it more easily understandable for them, my goal was to edit YouTube videos on my Mac into various segments, chunking the information and interspersing reflection and discussion questions to assess, “sooner than later,” my students’ understanding of the material presented. This was easy to do in a face-to-face (f2f) class simply by stopping the video, but I wanted to be able to assign the videos to students who were not present in f2f classes whether they were studying online or maybe just absent on the day of the presentation.  So, this is what I learned to do so easily, and you can do it, too. Here’s how:

First, open clipconverter.cc on the web which converts the YouTube video to various formats. (I chose the MP4 format because, from what I understood, it was the most useful on different platforms.) Paste the URL of the video you want to segment into clipconverter.cc, and press Continue.

Screen Shot 1

Decide what quality and file size you want your video segments to be, or use the default settings. Click Download and Start.

Screen Shot 2

Wait for the message that the conversion has been successfully completed.

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When it tells you it is successfully completed, click Download on this new screen.

Screen Shot 3

Once the movie is downloaded, click on it, and it opens up in Quicktime Player. Click the Edit command, decide where you want your video segments to start and stop, and click Trim.

Screen Shot-J

 

So, now you have your first segment. Upload this segment to your YouTube account by clicking on Creator Studio and then upload, and then wait for it to be processed. (Since the segments are generally quite small, this won’t take very long.) Repeat these steps as often as needed to segment the video the way you wish.

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Now  you can upload your new YouTube video segments to your presentation. I used Google Slides for my presentations because it is easy to upload YouTubes to my Google Sites and my blog here on WordPress.

In my presentations, I add a vocabulary slide or two to discuss before watching any of the video segments, and I generally leave two slides after each video segment, one for a question or reflection and the next for a response. You  decide what works best in your presentation for you and your students. At the end of the presentation, consider adding a brief re-check via Google Forms or Socrative for students to do individually or in pairs as one final comprehension check to finish up the lesson.

Enjoy! I think your students will appreciate this as mine do. It gives us ample time for discussion and assessment of comprehension between segments.

For related information:

 

 

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