Dem Bones

Dem Bones.png

In keeping with the Halloween season and the body/health posts of recent here on Web 2.0 for ESL, the link below is to a nice little video about “Dem Bones,” which identifies and explains the purposes of the bones and joints. The English will be somewhat difficult for beginning ESL students, but see what “body” vocabulary the students do recognize. You can then sing or play the song and have the students point to the bones. Later, they can sing along with you while pointing to the appropriate bones. Enjoy, and happy Halloween!

http://www.schooltube.com/embed_force/28e699a29b2be8e4520b/

Labor Day in the U.S.A. and Canada

Labor Day.pngDo your students know why they don’t have classes on Labor Day? They may appreciate their day off more if they know the history of the holiday here in the United States. Unionizing has been in the news a lot in the United States in the past few years. This could be a great discussion topic in your classes. I hope this exercise will help generate that conversation whether it is managed as a classroom activity or assigned to the students individually.

Students working independently should click on this EDpuzzle link to watch the video about Labor Day with the accompanying oral questions. They will have to stop the video from time to time or the oral questions will overlap with the video’s audio. Next, have the students look at the questions and the directions for each on the Google Form below. Then, when they are ready, they should play the video again and answer the oral questions, stopping and starting the video as necessary or as assigned.

Segmenting YouTube Videos for Better Comprehension Opportunities

I like my students to have opportunities to view content videos delivered in English that are NOT designed for English language learners, in which the speakers sometimes speak too fast and use unfamiliar vocabulary. In other words, they speak like many college instructors or business people whom my students will need to be able to understand sometime soon. So, to break down the information and make it more easily understandable for them, my goal was to edit YouTube videos on my Mac into various segments, chunking the information and interspersing reflection and discussion questions to assess, “sooner than later,” my students’ understanding of the material presented. This was easy to do in a face-to-face (f2f) class simply by stopping the video, but I wanted to be able to assign the videos to students who were not present in f2f classes whether they were studying online or maybe just absent on the day of the presentation.  So, this is what I learned to do so easily, and you can do it, too. Here’s how:

First, open clipconverter.cc on the web which converts the YouTube video to various formats. (I chose the MP4 format because, from what I understood, it was the most useful on different platforms.) Paste the URL of the video you want to segment into clipconverter.cc, and press Continue.

Screen Shot 1

Decide what quality and file size you want your video segments to be, or use the default settings. Click Download and Start.

Screen Shot 2

Wait for the message that the conversion has been successfully completed.

Screen Shot 2016-03-31 at 1.50.49 PM

When it tells you it is successfully completed, click Download on this new screen.

Screen Shot 3

Once the movie is downloaded, click on it, and it opens up in Quicktime Player. Click the Edit command, decide where you want your video segments to start and stop, and click Trim.

Screen Shot-J

 

So, now you have your first segment. Upload this segment to your YouTube account by clicking on Creator Studio and then upload, and then wait for it to be processed. (Since the segments are generally quite small, this won’t take very long.) Repeat these steps as often as needed to segment the video the way you wish.

Screen Shot 2016-03-31 at 1.28.37 PM


Now  you can upload your new YouTube video segments to your presentation. I used Google Slides for my presentations because it is easy to upload YouTubes to my Google Sites and my blog here on WordPress.

In my presentations, I add a vocabulary slide or two to discuss before watching any of the video segments, and I generally leave two slides after each video segment, one for a question or reflection and the next for a response. You  decide what works best in your presentation for you and your students. At the end of the presentation, consider adding a brief re-check via Google Forms or Socrative for students to do individually or in pairs as one final comprehension check to finish up the lesson.

Enjoy! I think your students will appreciate this as mine do. It gives us ample time for discussion and assessment of comprehension between segments.

For related information:

 

 

Listening for Content: How Geography Shaped Japan

The /v/ and /w/ Sounds

For those students who have difficulty distinguishing between the /v/ and /w/ initial consonant sounds, I hope this presentation is helpful. Many thanks to ABC Pronunciary and TedPower.co.uk for sharing their work. Please visit their sites to see more of their fine and extensive work offered to help our English language learners advance their skills.

This presentation was made with the use of all free apps, i.e., YouTube, ClipConverter.cc, QuickTime Player, and Jing.

To learn more about making interactive Google Slide presentations,  see Creating Interactive Google Presentations.



 

An ESL Listening Activity: Black Holes

black-holes-opener-615

Black Holes Part 1            Black Holes Part 2

(To run this presentation, you will need PowerPoint as well as Poll Everywhere, which has a free version, installed on your device.  (This does not play, however, on PCs. I am currently trying to figure that out!)

This is an interactive listening activity for intermediate to high-level English language learners who are interested in learning more about science and black holes and who appreciate the opportunity to listen to native English speakers talking at their normal pace. This two-part lesson utilizes the YouTube video, Black Holes for Beginners by Gleanix, which I edited into segments, each with a follow-up question based on the content of that segment. The free version of Poll Everywhere is used as the medium for student interaction and assessment.

An ESL Listening Activity: Black Holes can be used in the face-to-face or blended classroom as well as online. Students may be polled anonymously in a group or individually to get an overview of their understanding of the material presented. Students are able to respond to the questions on their cell phones, tablets, or computers, and they can see the group’s responses immediately for further discussion.

Because of my familiarity with PowerPoint for Windows and my new Mac, I chose PowerPoint for Mac as my lesson’s platform, which also requires the use of PowerPoint Presenter App for Mac, a free download. I understand that the apps I have used lend themselves equally well to Keynote although I have not experimented with that program yet since I am a new Mac user.

This lesson is divided into two parts only because of file size. It is meant to be covered in one class period.

black hole trivia

 

 

Exercise: Using the articles, “a,” “an,” and “the”