Segmenting YouTube Videos for Better Comprehension Opportunities

I like my students to have opportunities to view content videos delivered in English that are NOT designed for English language learners, in which the speakers sometimes speak too fast and use unfamiliar vocabulary. In other words, they speak like many college instructors or business people whom my students will need to be able to understand sometime soon. So, to break down the information and make it more easily understandable for them, my goal was to edit YouTube videos on my Mac into various segments, chunking the information and interspersing reflection and discussion questions to assess, “sooner than later,” my students’ understanding of the material presented. This was easy to do in a face-to-face (f2f) class simply by stopping the video, but I wanted to be able to assign the videos to students who were not present in f2f classes whether they were studying online or maybe just absent on the day of the presentation.  So, this is what I learned to do so easily, and you can do it, too. Here’s how:

First, open clipconverter.cc on the web which converts the YouTube video to various formats. (I chose the MP4 format because, from what I understood, it was the most useful on different platforms.) Paste the URL of the video you want to segment into clipconverter.cc, and press Continue.

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Decide what quality and file size you want your video segments to be, or use the default settings. Click Download and Start.

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Wait for the message that the conversion has been successfully completed.

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When it tells you it is successfully completed, click Download on this new screen.

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Once the movie is downloaded, click on it, and it opens up in Quicktime Player. Click the Edit command, decide where you want your video segments to start and stop, and click Trim.

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So, now you have your first segment. Upload this segment to your YouTube account by clicking on Creator Studio and then upload, and then wait for it to be processed. (Since the segments are generally quite small, this won’t take very long.) Repeat these steps as often as needed to segment the video the way you wish.

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Now  you can upload your new YouTube video segments to your presentation. I used Google Slides for my presentations because it is easy to upload YouTubes to my Google Sites and my blog here on WordPress.

In my presentations, I add a vocabulary slide or two to discuss before watching any of the video segments, and I generally leave two slides after each video segment, one for a question or reflection and the next for a response. You  decide what works best in your presentation for you and your students. At the end of the presentation, consider adding a brief re-check via Google Forms or Socrative for students to do individually or in pairs as one final comprehension check to finish up the lesson.

Enjoy! I think your students will appreciate this as mine do. It gives us ample time for discussion and assessment of comprehension between segments.

For related information:

 

 

10 Reasons Why I Blog

Why do I blog?

1)  I blog to reflect on what I’ve done with technology in my ESL classes.

2)  I blog to record what I need to remember the next time I try doing something similar.

3)  I blog to share with my colleagues across the country and the globe what has worked for me as well as what hasn’t.

4)  I blog to let those who are attempting to incorporate technology into their ESL classes know that we don’t have to be  technology whizzes or experts to use it; we just need to have the will and the determination to see it through and make it work.

5)  I blog to make my school colleagues aware that all of this doesn’t come as easily for me as they seem to think it does.  I spend a lot of time trying to learn about what is available and how to use it in ways that are beneficial for my students.  I also make a lot of mistakes as I’m starting.  If I can figure it out, they can, too.  It’s not a special talent; it’s a desire.

6)  I blog to let others know that there are ESL and IT teachers worldwide who are willing to answer our questions if we just send them a tweet!

7)  I blog to share with my friends and colleagues something important that I have learned about using technology in my classes; I’ve learned that asking my students a technology question or allowing them to come to my rescue from time to time is not a sign of weakness. Yes, I go to class prepared, and yes, I work out the glitches I’m aware of before getting in the classroom.  But, if something does go awry, and a student helps me out of my jam, allowing that student to shine is a wonderful thing, not a sign of weakness on my part.  Also, by my students recognizing that I believe in lifelong learning, risk-taking in my learning, and forgiving myself my mistakes, I hope I am teaching them something even more important than English.

8 )  I blog because I want my students to write, and I want them to teach their children to write and their grandchildren to write.  I want my students to know that what I ask them to do is important enough for me to do it as well.

9)  I blog to remind myself and others that we are not islands in this field.  There are always new ideas, new tools, and new challenges, and that by encouraging new and seasoned teachers to work together, sharing ideas, developing new methodologies, and improving our craft collectively, we make our profession stronger and our students, wherever they are, better prepared.

10)  So, why do I blog?  Surprisingly, because I have learned to love blogging!  It is as fun as it is challenging.  I get a tremendous sense of satisfaction when I complete a post.  It provides closure for me in one area of my teaching and learning, and allows me to go on to try something new.

So this is why I blog.  Why do you blog, or… why don’t you?

Little Reason to Envy

1.  I teach ESL.

2.  I teach ESL to students who want to learn.

3.  I teach ESL to students who want to learn and are respectful of their teachers.

4.  I teach ESL to students who want to learn and are respectful of their teachers and who say thank you at the end of each class.

5.  I teach ESL to students who want to learn and are respectful of their teachers and who say thank you at the end of each class, and I make a decent living.

6.  I teach ESL to students who want to learn and are respectful of their teachers and who say thank you at the end of each class, and I make a decent living working at a great college.

7.  I teach ESL to students who want to learn and are respectful of their teachers and who say thank you at the end of each class, and I make a decent living working at a great college with a great teachers’ union.

8.  I teach ESL to students who want to learn and are respectful of their teachers and who say thank you at the end of each class, and I make a decent living working at a great college with a great teachers’ union and have the liberty to teach in creative and innovative ways.

9.  I teach ESL to students who want to learn and are respectful of their teachers and who say thank you at the end of each class, and I make a decent living working at a great college with a great teachers’ union and have the liberty to teach in creative and innovative ways with technology.

10.  I teach ESL to students who want to learn and are respectful of their teachers and who say thank you at the end of each class, and I make a decent living working at a great college with a great teachers’ union and have the liberty to teach in creative and innovative ways with technology in every classroom for every student.

I am an ESL teacher at a great college with a great teachers’ union.  I am blessed.

Read also:  Monday Morning Pep Talk for Teachers on the Cool Cat Teacher Blog

Read the Words

Read the Words is a nifty little website that does what its name says, it reads the words. Paste a block of text in the frame, choose a voice, accent, and a customized avatar, and then click on the audio.  You can control the speed of the voice as well.

When you’re done, you can e-mail the audio or embed it in a web page.  This could be a great help to ESL students who understand the spoken word fairly well, but are having difficulties reading.

Annotated Bibliography – Twitter, Social Networking, and Communities of Practice

TESL-EJ posts an Annotated Bibiliography-Twitter, Social Networking, and Communities of Practice by Kristi Newgarden about social networking tools such as Twitter as learning tools, specifically for language learning.  Not an easy read, but an interesting one of you are considering using Twitter in your classroom.

Real English

Real English is gold for ESL because it contains short videos for all levels of students which focus on bits of language and culture.  The language portion is supported by the cultural information shown in the video-almost like being there.  What’s more, the video includes clips from a variety of English-speaking countries and sub-cultures as well as helpful notes to teachers.  Did I mention that it’s free?

TOEFL Prep

Jason’s TOEFL iBTv , a video lecture for preparing students for the TOEFL, focuses primarily on the speaking and writing portion of the test.