10 Reasons Why I Blog

Why do I blog?

1)  I blog to reflect on what I’ve done with technology in my ESL classes.

2)  I blog to record what I need to remember the next time I try doing something similar.

3)  I blog to share with my colleagues across the country and the globe what has worked for me as well as what hasn’t.

4)  I blog to let those who are attempting to incorporate technology into their ESL classes know that we don’t have to be  technology whizzes or experts to use it; we just need to have the will and the determination to see it through and make it work.

5)  I blog to make my school colleagues aware that all of this doesn’t come as easily for me as they seem to think it does.  I spend a lot of time trying to learn about what is available and how to use it in ways that are beneficial for my students.  I also make a lot of mistakes as I’m starting.  If I can figure it out, they can, too.  It’s not a special talent; it’s a desire.

6)  I blog to let others know that there are ESL and IT teachers worldwide who are willing to answer our questions if we just send them a tweet!

7)  I blog to share with my friends and colleagues something important that I have learned about using technology in my classes; I’ve learned that asking my students a technology question or allowing them to come to my rescue from time to time is not a sign of weakness. Yes, I go to class prepared, and yes, I work out the glitches I’m aware of before getting in the classroom.  But, if something does go awry, and a student helps me out of my jam, allowing that student to shine is a wonderful thing, not a sign of weakness on my part.  Also, by my students recognizing that I believe in lifelong learning, risk-taking in my learning, and forgiving myself my mistakes, I hope I am teaching them something even more important than English.

8 )  I blog because I want my students to write, and I want them to teach their children to write and their grandchildren to write.  I want my students to know that what I ask them to do is important enough for me to do it as well.

9)  I blog to remind myself and others that we are not islands in this field.  There are always new ideas, new tools, and new challenges, and that by encouraging new and seasoned teachers to work together, sharing ideas, developing new methodologies, and improving our craft collectively, we make our profession stronger and our students, wherever they are, better prepared.

10)  So, why do I blog?  Surprisingly, because I have learned to love blogging!  It is as fun as it is challenging.  I get a tremendous sense of satisfaction when I complete a post.  It provides closure for me in one area of my teaching and learning, and allows me to go on to try something new.

So this is why I blog.  Why do you blog, or… why don’t you?

Little Reason to Envy

1.  I teach ESL.

2.  I teach ESL to students who want to learn.

3.  I teach ESL to students who want to learn and are respectful of their teachers.

4.  I teach ESL to students who want to learn and are respectful of their teachers and who say thank you at the end of each class.

5.  I teach ESL to students who want to learn and are respectful of their teachers and who say thank you at the end of each class, and I make a decent living.

6.  I teach ESL to students who want to learn and are respectful of their teachers and who say thank you at the end of each class, and I make a decent living working at a great college.

7.  I teach ESL to students who want to learn and are respectful of their teachers and who say thank you at the end of each class, and I make a decent living working at a great college with a great teachers’ union.

8.  I teach ESL to students who want to learn and are respectful of their teachers and who say thank you at the end of each class, and I make a decent living working at a great college with a great teachers’ union and have the liberty to teach in creative and innovative ways.

9.  I teach ESL to students who want to learn and are respectful of their teachers and who say thank you at the end of each class, and I make a decent living working at a great college with a great teachers’ union and have the liberty to teach in creative and innovative ways with technology.

10.  I teach ESL to students who want to learn and are respectful of their teachers and who say thank you at the end of each class, and I make a decent living working at a great college with a great teachers’ union and have the liberty to teach in creative and innovative ways with technology in every classroom for every student.

I am an ESL teacher at a great college with a great teachers’ union.  I am blessed.

Read also:  Monday Morning Pep Talk for Teachers on the Cool Cat Teacher Blog

Pink Glove Dance

Isn’t it beautiful to see what team work can achieve! Maybe with team work and contributions one day soon we’ll eradicate this insidious disease that has affected all of our lives in one way or another. Let’s dance the Pink Glove Dance, celebrate the survivors, be  warriors, and educate the masses!

Vodpod videos no longer available.

more about “Pink Glove Dance“, posted with vodpod

Classroom Rules for the 21st Century

RT @eduinnovatio So cool, a school district in Australia turned my “New Classroom Rules” http://twurl.nl/0zi712 into a video http://twurl.nl/k18zek

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At first glance, the classroom rules below may throw you.  But, remember, we no longer expect our students to sit quietly and listen to the words of “the man” in front of the room.  We expect, no, we require our students to challenge, to investigate, to interact, collaborate, and create.  We are preparing them for a world we haven’t yet seen, for a world that doesn’t yet exist somewhere in the 21st century.

Posted on June 30, 2009 on Education Innovation

New Classroom Rules

1. Come to school every day, unless you would rather just go on line.

2.  Come to class on time, or log into your online class anytime day or night, whenever it is most convenient to you.

3.  Leave your seat only when necessary, which should be often to go collaborate with others or demonstrate something to the class.

4. Bring required materials, including your laptop and cell phone every day.

5. Talk only when permitted, text at all other times.

6. Don’t Talk to your neighbors, unless you are sharing your ideas, asking for help or giving help.

7. Use polite speech when speaking, blogging, texting, Twittering, instant messaging, etc.

8. Do not cheat, but remix, re-purpose, and sample other peoples’ work and ideas and give them credit.

9. Follow the teacher’s directions immediately and your peers’ directions too.

10. Be polite, courteous, and respectful at all times in both physical and virtual space.

11. Complete all assignments neatly and on time and submit on line or post to your blog or wiki, and share it with your followers on Twitter.

12.  Keep your hands to yourself, but share all your ideas and knowledge with others in your Personal Learning Network.

13. Be quiet in lines, hallways, and restrooms, unless you are at home and logged into your on line classroom, in which case you can dance and play music.

14. If you need help raise your hand, but don’t wait for the teacher get help from your neighbors and post your question to your online Personal Learning Network.

15. Know what you are supposed to be learning, why, and what you will do with the knowledge.

My Upcoming Wiki for ESL

I’ve decided that my next “creation” will be a wiki for Advanced ESL. Rather than putting everything on Blackboard, I will keep my resources in a wiki similar to the edtec4matc wiki. I will ask other instructors if they’d like to collaborate on it with me, adding to it resources for grammar, reading, writing, pronunciation, and whatever else is necessary. It will include videos, links to exercises, links to lessons using web 2.0 applications, ESL blogs, and whatever else that would seem appropriate and worthwhile. Actually, I’m excited about developing this idea. Perhaps it could evolve into becoming an online course, or perhaps it will be a legacy. We have to leave something worthwhile behind when we leave.  We’ll see.