What Does Failure Really Mean?

Good for class discussion, research, writing, and/or oral presentations. What does failure really mean? What words do the students think are synonymous with failure?What can we learn from failure? Can we learn without ever failing? Who is Brian Acton? What was his failure? What happened to him after his “failure?” Can you name anyone else who “failed” and became, not only rich and famous but one of the world’s most influential people? Is it possible to change the way we feel about failing? Might there be a more positive way to refer to failure? Take a look at the video below, and then find out more about these “failures,” their life stories, and that of other “failures” you may be familiar with. ​Maybe after this discussion, the students can come up with a different definition of what failing really means.

//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

Activity Picture Prompts for Discussion

Here are some slides which show a variety of activities to elicit conversation in your language classes. Ask your students about what they see. Use these slides to talk about clothing and different kinds of equipment needed for the activities. (Are they count or non-count items? Describe them.) What different kinds (and levels) of skills are needed to participate in these activities? How are these skills acquired? (Are there any similarities to acquiring language skills?)
Are these activities common where the students come from? Did they participate in them “back home?” Have them talk about an event they participated in. (This is how I found out one of my students was actually an Olympian!)
What about now? Do they engage in these activities in their adopted homes? Why or why not? What are the benefits? What are the difficulties? Are there health benefits to participating in these activities? What are they?  Would they recommend that other people try them? Are these skills for careers or hobbies? (What’s the difference?) Are there opportunities for professionals and amateurs to participate?
Your students can bring a picture of a hobby, sport, or activity that they enjoy participating in and meet in groups of three or four to discuss the different pictures. The group can then select one of its members to present it to the class. Or, turn this discussion into a writing (blogging) activity or an oral demonstration presentation to put into a vlog. Students can tweet the links with an image to their online presentations. The possibilities are endless!

Vocabulary Acquisition via @ESLlibrary

//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

Can I Use This in My Project by @jasonrobertshaw

Before including someone else’s picture, video, or music in your project, take a look at this chart put together by Jason Robertshaw and shared with us on Twitter.

Can I Use This

Follow Robertshaw on Twitter:  @jasonrobertshaw

Picasso’s Meaning of Life

The Number One Mistake Everyone Makes on Twitter

Thanks to , Working at VaynerMedia on Nov 21, 2013

Hide Youtube Comments with Chrome Extension